Iqaluit

Iqaluit is the capital and largest settlement of the Canadian territory of Nunavut.

Iqaluit is the capital and largest settlement of the Canadian territory of Nunavut, and is located on a south-eastern inlet of Baffin Island. Population 7,100 as of 2008. Iqaluit is generally accessible only by air and, under the right ice conditions, by sea. Iqaluit has no roads leading in or out and is the only Canadian capital not connected directly or by ferry with the North American highway system.

Iqaluit is known for its ice-capped mountains and tundra valleys. Near the city, Sylvia Grinnell Territorial Park is home to caribou and Arctic foxes. Qaummaarviit Territorial Park, on a tiny island near the city, contains archaeological remains of the ancient Thule people.

This exciting, dynamic city is the political, business, journalism and transportation hub of Nunavut, with an excellent airport. The landing strip is long enough to land the space shuttle, so it is often used for cold weather testing of the world’s largest new aircraft.

Formerly known as Frobisher Bay, the modern city of Iqaluit is rich with traditional Inuit culture. It is the home of many Inuit artists, filmmakers and musicians, plus there are arts and culture festivals staged in the spring and summer that bring artists here from across the territory.

The friendly people of Iqaluit — the ‘Iqalumiut’ — love to go out on the land, sea and ice at all times of the year to enjoy a variety of outdoor activities.

Iqaluit is located near beautiful parklands that feature a range of landscapes, mountains, rivers, waterfalls and ancient Thule sites to visit.